Photo story: Creating a protected area plan for Indio Maíz

November 16, 2017

Over the past month members of the GWC team have been working with local people on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua to create a community-driven, protected area management plan for Indio Maíz Biological Reserve. The reserve forms part of one of the five biggest forests remaining in Central America and is home to Baird’s Tapir, Read more

From Words to Visuals: Re-thinking the Protected Area Management Plan

October 18, 2017

Protected area plans are often long, complex documents that may just end up sitting on the shelves and unused. Over the coming weeks, GWC aims to take a novel approach to the standard protected area plan by developing a plan that is entirely visual, transcending language barriers and accessible to anyone who stands to gain Read more

Finding Hope in a Hurricane’s Aftermath

June 23, 2017

In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Otto, a Category 2 hurricane that barreled through southeast Nicaragua’s Indio Maíz Biological Reserve, much of the landscape seemed almost desolate at first glance. I saw Howler Monkeys being picked apart by vultures and the lifeless, desiccated bodies of Three-toed Sloths still clutching to the branches of leafless trees. Read more

Celebrating World Tapir Day

April 26, 2017

As GWC’s tapir expert, it is no secret that I am very much enamored with the planet’s four species of tapir. And although my experience with tapirs was very much a love-at-first-sight type of story, I have also fallen in love with a diversity of species at first sight, including Giant Anteaters, Great Green Macaws, Read more

From the Field: Hurricane Otto Tears Through Indio Maíz

December 12, 2016

I have spent the last few years helping protect Nicaragua’s Indio Maíz Biological Reserve in collaboration with the indigenous Rama and afro-descendant Kriol communities who call it home. I have spent many months in Indio Maíz researching its flora and fauna, countless hours in meetings and negotiations with authorities to change their meager commitment to Read more

Conserving tapirs beyond borders

September 6, 2016

The globally endangered Baird’s Tapir is the largest terrestrial mammal in the Americas. Large females can reach 600+ pounds in the proper environment and season. The species ranges from Mexico to Colombia and occurs in a variety of habitats, from the lowland rainforests of Central America’s Caribbean slope to the highland cloud forests of southern Read more

Investing in Nicaragua’s natural heritage

July 25, 2016

Photo: Children colored jaguars after learning about the species in our second Festival for the Conservation of Indio-Maíz in Maravilla, Nicaragua. (Photo courtesy of Fundación del Río) In a spate of recent articles and blogs Nicaragua has been touted as “the next Costa Rica” for ecotourists with a taste for tropical climes. While the country Read more

Honoring endangered species all year round

May 20, 2016

May 20th marks Endangered Species Day, but at Global Wildlife Conservation, we celebrate biodiversity every second of every day. We checked in with GWC staff and GWC associate conservation scientists to learn more about why each person is committed to doing what it takes to conserve wildlife—and to discover which endangered species are among the Read more

Tapirs to the global warming rescue

March 20, 2016

One of the planet’s most important helpers in combatting global warming lives deep in the Amazon rainforest and looks like a stout donkey with a elephantine nose and a mohawk; a bit like a creature from the creative mind of Jim Henson. It’s the Lowland Tapir (Tapirus terrestris), an herbivorous mammal that is helping to Read more

Q&A from the field: Nicaragua

December 17, 2015

Chris Jordan is GWC’s Nicaragua programs director. His current research focuses on Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii) and jaguar (Panthera onca) spatial ecology, occupancy and conservation along the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua. We sat down with him to talk more about his work—and what he loves most about his job protecting species. Q: What’s your favorite Read more