New camera trap images peer into hidden world of the Annamites

January 10, 2017

On its face a camera trap is a simple device: a camera, connected to a sensor, that takes a picture when the sensor detects movement. But this simple creation has revolutionized wildlife surveys, and nowhere more so than in tropical rainforests, where animals are often rare, difficult to observe and elusive. These “eyes in the Read more

Power to the Forests of Palawan

December 16, 2016

Flashback to January 2014: For someone born and raised in Puerto Princesa, Palawan, it was my first time to hear of a mountain called Cleopatra’s Needle. As a typical Palaweño, I only knew of the famous sites such as the Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park (Underground River), and the Tubbataha Reefs National Park and Read more

From the Field: Hurricane Otto Tears Through Indio Maíz

December 12, 2016

I have spent the last few years helping protect Nicaragua’s Indio Maíz Biological Reserve in collaboration with the indigenous Rama and afro-descendant Kriol communities who call it home. I have spent many months in Indio Maíz researching its flora and fauna, countless hours in meetings and negotiations with authorities to change their meager commitment to Read more

Q&A with Wildlife Artist Dao Van Hoang

December 8, 2016

Very few individuals in the world have been fortunate to lay eyes on an Annamite-striped Rabbit, a unique rabbit with stripes like a tiger, only discovered by science in Southeast Asia in the mid-90s. Among them, however, is GWC associate conservation scientist Andrew Tilker, and thanks to his friend artist Dao Van Hoang, Tilker will Read more

Coming Together to #MakeASplash

December 5, 2016

By Dune Ives, Executive Director of the Lonely Whale Foundation On World Ocean Day, June 8th, 2016, Sir Richard Branson challenged Adrian Grenier to swim the Straits of Messina on Sept. 27 for ocean health. Adrian accepted his challenge. Adrian wasn’t a swimmer. Well, he could swim, but never before had he completed an open Read more

Before Two Degrees: Diagnosing the Pollinator Problem

December 1, 2016

By Savannah Miller, GWC guest blogger Imagine the Rocky Mountains as you would the human body. Think of the organs as the slopes, meadows, valleys, and forests, and the heart as the snow-packed peaks, feeding the landscape with snowmelt through its arteries—the Rio Grande, Yellowstone and Saskatchewan. But it’s our necessary warriors, the pollinators, that Read more

Meeting launches protected areas monitoring program in Chile

November 28, 2016

Researchers have been using camera traps to monitor Andean Cats in Northern Chile for the past 12 years. Last week conservationists, including GWC’s program manager of Wild Cat Conservation, Jim Sanderson, met at Universidad Católica de Temuco in Chile to launch a monitoring program for the country’s entire system of protected areas (SNASPE). Jim presented Read more

Tamaraw Adventures

November 23, 2016

It’s blazing hot, the mountains are steep, and with every crest comes another. We drop our packs atop a crest, gulp back some water, then start to enjoy the amazing vista that had seemed so daunting just seconds before. We all gaze at the beauty of our surroundings listening to the beating of our hearts Read more

Giving Thanks: For the Annamite Striped Rabbit

November 22, 2016

I came to Southeast Asia thinking that I would study tigers. Instead I study tiger rabbits. If you had told me four years ago that the focus of my work, indeed my obsession, would be furry fluff balls that could fit in my hand, I would have thought you were crazy. And yet that is Read more

Giving Thanks: For Rangers

November 22, 2016

I am thankful for rangers. Without rangers, our parks would be nothing but lines on a map. Without rangers, species targeted by poachers would be in a much worse state than they are now. Without rangers, the communities that live around parks would be much less well informed and much less willing to sustainably manage Read more