Blog

  • Rainforest Haiku by Talented 5th Grade Students

    05/13/14

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    A group of fifth grade students at the Brimmer and May School in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts spent the year studying the need for forest conservation, and this is what they accomplished!

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  • Encountering the Unknown Part 2

    10/24/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    Following from Part One, published last week, which introduced the geology, biology and anthropology of New Guinea, Part Two of this article focuses on the biological survey carried out at three sites within the Hindenburg Wall region of southwest Papua New Guinea. Organised by the Wildlife Conservation Society and funded by the Papua New Guinea Sustainable Development Programme, this research was carried out by a team of local and international biologists from Global Wildlife Conservation earlier this year. Part Two of the article focuses on the plants and animals that were encountered, as well as the research team and the future conservation status of the region.

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  • Encountering the Unknown Part 1

    10/17/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    An introduction to the geological, biological and anthropological variety of New Guinea, the region’s geographical association with its neighbours in the South Pacific, and why the area is inhabited by unique flora and fauna and distinct human societies. Next week, Part Two will continue by focussing on a pioneering biological survey carried out in southwest Papua New Guinea, and will feature some of the fascinating species that were encountered and how this survey can help conservationists protect the area in the future.

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  • The poisonous “cocoa frog,” brilliantly colored fishes, and tiny aquatic beetles are among more than 60 species recently discovered by a team of scientists exploring the remote rainforests of Southeastern Suriname in South America. The recently documented wildlife are likely new to the science community.

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  • Getting back- the adventure continued!

    03/26/12

    Posted By: Leeanne Alonso In Suriname

    While the team was now closer to Palumeu, they still had to get around several dangerous rapids on the Palumeu River to get back. The now 29 men from Apetina and Palumeu bravely spent several days carrying and dragging the large dugout boats along the trail 3 km through the forest from the RAP camp to the METS camp to get around the largest of the rapids. They also carried food and gear this distance. The RAP team was amazed at their strength and very grateful for their support.

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  • RAP Site 4 - Kasikasima Camp

    03/19/12

    Posted By: Leeanne Alonso In Suriname

    The next day, scientists from CI-Suriname and nine men from Palumeu arrived at the small village. The men immediately set to constructing a base camp for the RAP team along the river on the side of the Kasikasima Mountain. They constructed two large tents for sleeping, a kitchen tent, and a laboratory tent. The RAP team was able to move in the next day. The rest of the RAP team arrived the next day after a challenging three day voyage by boat. From this camp, the team was able to reach the Kasikasima mountain by a three hour hike along well established trail system set up by METS for tourists that they bring out to this area. The METS camp was located about one hour hike along the river from the RAP camp.

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  • Evacuation! and RAP Site 3

    03/18/12

    Posted By: Leeanne Alonso In Suriname

    Thus on March 18, the RAP team evacuated the first base camp and set off toward the next camp near the Kasikasima Mountain. The botany, water quality, and fish teams, along with all the Amerindians and most of the support crew headed out in boats. They were able to sample a third site (RAP Site 3) at the confluence of the Palumeu River with the Makrutu Creek en route. Eleven of the RAP scientists along with the National Geographic team departed by helicopter and landed at Kampu, a small village across the river from the Kasikasima Mountain. The scientists spent one night there.

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  • RAP Sites 1 & 2- Upper Palameu Camp/Juuru Camp and Grensgebergte Mountain

    03/08/12

    Posted By: Leeanne Alonso In Suriname

    The RAP scientific team of 16 scientists, accompanied by a journalist and photographer from National Geographic Magazine, two game wardens from Nature Conservation Division, and a medic flew from Paramaribo to Palumeu on March 8. They brought along with them about 2000 kilos in food and scientific equipment! The RAP team and gear were transported from Palumeu to the RAP Camp 1 by helicopter over the following three days. Each flight to base camp took approximately one hour round trip. On one trip, the helicopter had mechanical difficulties while at the base camp and was almost stuck there overnight. A problem with the rotor motor was found and a replacement helicopter was sent in.

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  • Advance Team prepares the way

    03/06/12

    Posted By: Leeanne Alonso In Suriname

    Prior to these dates, an advance team of 21 men from the Amerindian villages of Apetina (Wayana) and Palumeu (Trio and Wayana) along with staff from Conservation International-Suriname and local film-makers led a 10 day reconnaissance mission prior to the RAP to locate and set up the first RAP base camp (RAP Site 1). The team traversed and carried six heavy boats around many treacherous rapids to get far up the Palumeu River. The water level was very high, which made the trip all the more dangerous and lengthy. They reached Juuru camp on March 6, a site where the Trio and Wayana occasionally camp on their way to Brazil. From this site, a trail to the border with Brazil commences. The men from Apetina quickly got to work to clear a 30 m x 30 m site within the forest within which a small helicopter could land. They chose the site of a former small agricultural plot so cutting was a bit easier. They also set up a very large base camp consisting of two large tents (tarps over poles) for hanging hammocks in which to sleep, a kitchen tent, an eating tent, and a laboratory tent for the soon to be arriving scientific team. The camp was at the bottom of a steep hill, right along the Palumeu River, which at this point was a fairly small creek.

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