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Archive - October, 2013

  • Encountering the Unknown Part 2

    10/24/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    Following from Part One, published last week, which introduced the geology, biology and anthropology of New Guinea, Part Two of this article focuses on the biological survey carried out at three sites within the Hindenburg Wall region of southwest Papua New Guinea. Organised by the Wildlife Conservation Society and funded by the Papua New Guinea Sustainable Development Programme, this research was carried out by a team of local and international biologists from Global Wildlife Conservation earlier this year. Part Two of the article focuses on the plants and animals that were encountered, as well as the research team and the future conservation status of the region.

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  • Encountering the Unknown Part 1

    10/17/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    An introduction to the geological, biological and anthropological variety of New Guinea, the region’s geographical association with its neighbours in the South Pacific, and why the area is inhabited by unique flora and fauna and distinct human societies. Next week, Part Two will continue by focussing on a pioneering biological survey carried out in southwest Papua New Guinea, and will feature some of the fascinating species that were encountered and how this survey can help conservationists protect the area in the future.

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  • The poisonous “cocoa frog,” brilliantly colored fishes, and tiny aquatic beetles are among more than 60 species recently discovered by a team of scientists exploring the remote rainforests of Southeastern Suriname in South America. The recently documented wildlife are likely new to the science community.

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  • Exploring for the first time the most remote forests in the greenest country in the world, scientists with Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program and Global Wildlife Conservation document new species and climate-resilient sources of freshwater and other ecosystem services central to Suriname’s sustainable development.

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