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  • Guyana, also known as the Land of Many Waters, is indeed very rich in diverse freshwater habitats. Ichthyologist, Dr. Donald Taphorn tells us about the three freshwater rivers he and his team will explore during WWF Guianas and GWC's next biodiversity survey starting September 9th.

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  • ProAves, Rainforest Trust and Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC) have announced the creation of the Chamicero de Perijá Nature Reserve, the first protected area in northern Colombia’s Serranía de Perijá mountain range.

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  • Guatemala’s National Congress created the Sierra Caral National Protected Area on May 13, making it the nation’s first federally protected area to be established in seven years. The core of the new 47,000 acre protected area is the Sierra Caral Amphibian Conservation Reserve, which local conservation partner FUNDAECO created with the support of Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC) and Rainforest Trust (RT) in 2012.

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  • Southeast Asia is the center of the world’s species extinction crisis, yet gets very little attention. Global Wildlife Conservation's partner, the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) has filled that gap with critical funding that includes a GWC project to save the Critically Endangered Saola (scientific name Pseudoryx nghetinhensis aka ‘The Last Unicorn’). CEPF announced this important new round of funding today May 22, International Biodiversity Day.

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  • Rainforest Haiku by Talented 5th Grade Students

    05/13/14

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    A group of fifth grade students at the Brimmer and May School in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts spent the year studying the need for forest conservation, and this is what they accomplished!

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  • A consortium of partners including the Amphibian Survival Alliance, Rainforest Trust (RT), Global Wildlife Conservation (GWC) and the American Bird Conservancy (ABC) have come together to enable local partner Fundación Jocotoco to purchase more than 270,000 acres of critical wildlife habitat in Ecuador. The mammoth property acquisition, which includes the 18,714-foot Antisana Volcano, will create a permanent refuge for three threatened species of frogs from the genus Pristimantis found nowhere else and the largest population of Andean Condor in the Northern Andes.

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  • Leaping to the Rescue: Million Dollar Fund for Frogs

    12/17/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    The Amphibian Survival Alliance, Rainforest Trust, Global Wildlife Conservation and Andrew Sabin Family Foundation are taking a bold step in the fight to save amphibians by committing one million dollars to protect key habitats worldwide over the coming year. The fund, which has been named the Leapfrog Conservation Fund, will be dispersed through the ASA – the world’s largest partnership for amphibian conservation – to strategically protect and manage key habitats for frogs, salamanders, caecilians and other species for the benefit of current and future generations.

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  • Global Rescue Partners with Global Wildlife Conservation

    11/20/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    Offers Medical and Security Evacuation Services to Support Remote Exploration Needed to Save Threatened Species

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  • Encountering the Unknown Part 2

    10/24/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    Following from Part One, published last week, which introduced the geology, biology and anthropology of New Guinea, Part Two of this article focuses on the biological survey carried out at three sites within the Hindenburg Wall region of southwest Papua New Guinea. Organised by the Wildlife Conservation Society and funded by the Papua New Guinea Sustainable Development Programme, this research was carried out by a team of local and international biologists from Global Wildlife Conservation earlier this year. Part Two of the article focuses on the plants and animals that were encountered, as well as the research team and the future conservation status of the region.

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  • Encountering the Unknown Part 1

    10/17/13

    Posted By: Global Wildlife

    An introduction to the geological, biological and anthropological variety of New Guinea, the region’s geographical association with its neighbours in the South Pacific, and why the area is inhabited by unique flora and fauna and distinct human societies. Next week, Part Two will continue by focussing on a pioneering biological survey carried out in southwest Papua New Guinea, and will feature some of the fascinating species that were encountered and how this survey can help conservationists protect the area in the future.

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