Don Church, Ph.D. +

Don Church, Ph.D.

Don Church, Ph.D. - President and Director of Conservation

​Dr. Church works to identify global conservation priorities and conducts fieldwork with local partners to develop projects aimed at conserving globally threatened species and their habitats. Many of these priority sites are known, and more are being discovered, as GWC and partner organizations explore the planet’s most remote locations. Once a site has been identified as important to the persistence of one or more species, Don and his colleagues look for and create opportunities to protect the key habitats, and develop long-term programs that ensure conservation of the site’s biodiversity. Opportunities typically arise through active engagement with local conservationists, governments, and organizations. While taking steps to catalyze and act on conservation opportunities, GWC works with local partners to build the capacity necessary to implement and sustain projects.

Education

  • ​Ph.D., Biology, University of Virginia
  • 
M.S., Biology, Southeastern Louisiana University

  • B.S., Zoology, University of Washington

Contact and Social

Email: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
  • ​Conservation Biology
  • Herpetology
  • Establishing Protected Areas

​Don Church is a wildlife biologist with specialties in herpetology and establishing new protected areas. He works to identify global conservation priorities and conducts fieldwork with local partners to develop projects aimed at conserving globally threatened species and their habitats. His primary focus is to protect the last remaining habitats for the world’s most threatened species. Many of these key sites are known and more are being discovered as GWC and partner organizations explore the planet’s most remote locations. Once a site has been identified as critical to the persistence of one or more species, Don and his colleagues look for and create opportunities to protect the key habitats, and develop programs that ensure the conservation of the site’s biodiversity. Opportunities typically arise through active engagement with local conservationists, government, and organizations. While taking steps to catalyze and act on conservation opportunities, GWC works with local partners to build the capacity necessary to implement and sustain projects.

Church, D. R., C. Gascon, M. Van Fossen, A. Grisel, and C., L. A. Solorzano. 2009. Testing the efficiency of global-scale conservation planning using data on Andean amphibians. In: Setting conservation targets for managed forest landscapes. Editors: M. A. Villard and B. D. Jonsson.



Bailey, L. L., W. L. Kendall, and D. R. Church. 2009. Exploring extensions to multi-state models with multiple unobservable states. Pages 693-709 in David L. Thomson, Evan G. Cooch, and Michael J. Conroy, editors. Modeling demographic processes in marked populations. Environmental and ecological statistics 3. Springer, New York and London. xxiv, 1136 pp.



Morris, W.F., C.A. Pfister, S. Tuljapurkar, C.V. Haridas, C. Boggs, M.S. Boyce, E.M. Bruna, D.R. Church, T. Coulson, D.F. Doak, S. Forsyth, J.M. Gaillard, C.C. Horvitz, S. Kalisz, B.E. Kendall, T.M. Knight, C.T. Lee, and E.S. Menges. 2008. Longevity determines sensitivity of plant and animal populations to changing climatic variability. Ecology 89:19-25.


Church, D. R. 2008. Role of current versus historical hydrology in amphibian species turnover within local pond communities. Copeia:115-125.



Church, D. R., H. M. Wilbur, L. L. Bailey, W. L. Kendall, and J. Hines. 2007. Iteroparity in the variable environment of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. Ecology 88:891-903.


Ricketts, T., E. Dinerstein, T. Boucher, T. M. Brooks, S. H. M. Butchart, M. Hoffmann, J. Lamoreux, J. Morrison, M. Parr, J. D. Pilgrim, A. S. L. Rodrigues, W. Sechrest, G. E. Wallace, K. Berlin, J. Bielby, N. D. Burgess, D. R. Church, N. Cox, D. Knox, C. Loucks, G. W. Luck, L. L. Master, R. Moore, R. Naidoo, R. Ridgely, G. E. Schatz, G. Shire, H. Strand, W. Wettengel, and E. Wikramanayake. 2005. Pinpointing and preventing imminent extinctions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 102:18497-18501.




Mittermeier, R. A., and e. al. 2004. Introduction: Global Priority Setting for Biodiversity Conservation. Pages 19-68 in R. A. Mittermeier, P. Robles Gil, M. Hoffmann, J. Pilgrim, T. Brooks, C. G. Mittermeier, J. Lamoreux, and G. A. B. da Fonseca, editors. Hotspots Revisited: Earth's Biologically Richest and Most Endangered Terrestrial Ecoregions. Conservation International, Washington, D.C.


Bailey, L.L., W.L. Kendall, D.R. Church, and H.M. Wilbur. 2004. Estimating survival and breeding probabilities for pond-breeding amphibians using a modified robust design. Ecology 85: 2456-2466.


Church, S.A., J. M. Kraus, J. C. Mitchell, D. R. Church, and D. R. Taylor. 2003. Evidence for multiple Pleistocene refugia in the postglacial expansion of the eastern tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum. Evolution 57:372-383.


Church, D. R., H. M. Wilbur, S. M. Roble, F. C. Huber, and M. W. Donahue. 2003. Observations on breeding by eastern spadefoots (Scaphiopus holbrookii) in Augusta County, Virginia. Banisteria 20:21-24.


Church, D. R. and J. C. Mitchell. 2003. Coluber constrictor constrictor. Winter activity. Herpetological Review 34:62-63.


Grace, M. S. and D. R. Church. 2003. Ambystoma maculatum. Vernal migration. Herpetological Review 34:44-45.


Mitchell, J. C. and D. R. Church. 2003. Leucistic marbled salamanders (Ambystoma opacum) in Virginia. Banisteria 19:8-10.


Church, D. R. and R. K. Okazaki. 2002. Seasonal variation of plasma testosterone titres in male redback salamanders, Plethodon cinereus. Amphibia-Reptilia 23:93-97.


Grace, M. S., O. M. Woodward, D. R. Church, and G. Calisch. 2001. Prey targeting by the infrared-imaging snake Python molurus: effects of experimental and congenital visual deprivation. Behavioural Brain Research 119(1):23-31.


Campbell, A. L., T. A. Bunning, M. O. Stone, D. R. Church, and M. S. Grace. 1999. Surface ultrastructure of pit organ, spectacle, and non-pit organ epidermis of infrared-imaging boid snakes: A scanning probe and scanning electron microscopy study. Journal of Structural Biology 126:105-120.


Grace, M. S., D. R. Church, C. Kelley, and T. M. Cooper. 1999. The Python pit organ: immunocytochemical and imaging analysis of a sensitive natural infrared detector. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 14:53-59.


Sever, D. A., J. S. Doody, C. A. Reddish, M. M. Wenner, and D. R. Church. 1996. Sperm storage in spermathecae of the Great Lamper Eel (Amphiuma tridactylum). Journal of Morphology 230:79-97.


Dunlap, K. D. and D. R. Church. 1996. Interleukin-1β reduces daily activity level in male lizards, Sceloporous occidentalis. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity 10:68-73.


Doody, J. S., D. R. Church, R. A. Anderson, A. Meier, and P. Connelly. 1995. Geographic distribution extension of the salamander Amphiuma means in Louisiana. New Parish record. Herpetological Review 26:150.


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